Gendarme.Rules.Security.Cas

Gendarme's Code Access Security (CAS) rules are located in the Gendarme.Rules.Security.Cas.dll assembly. Latest sources are available from anonymous SVN.

Table of contents

Rules

AddMissingTypeInheritanceDemandRule

The rule checks for types that are not sealed but have a LinkDemand. In this case the type should also have an InheritanceDemand for the same permissions. An alternative is to seal the type.

Bad example:

[SecurityPermission (SecurityAction.LinkDemand, ControlThread = true)]
public class Bad {
}

Good example (InheritanceDemand):

[SecurityPermission (SecurityAction.LinkDemand, ControlThread = true)]
[SecurityPermission (SecurityAction.InheritanceDemand, ControlThread = true)]
public class Correct {
}

Good example (sealed):

[SecurityPermission (SecurityAction.LinkDemand, ControlThread = true)]
public sealed class Correct {
}

Notes

  • Before Gendarme 2.2 this rule was part of Gendarme.Rules.Security and named TypeLinkDemandRule.

DoNotExposeFieldsInSecuredTypeRule

The rule checks for types that are secured by Demand or LinkDemandbut also expose visible fields. Access to these fields is not covered by the declarative demands, opening potential security holes.

Bad example:

[SecurityPermission (SecurityAction.LinkDemand, ControlThread = true)]
public class Bad {
}

Good example (InheritanceDemand):

[SecurityPermission (SecurityAction.LinkDemand, ControlThread = true)]
[SecurityPermission (SecurityAction.InheritanceDemand, ControlThread = true)]
public class Correct {
}

Good example (sealed):

[SecurityPermission (SecurityAction.LinkDemand, ControlThread = true)]
public sealed class Correct {
}

Notes

  • Before Gendarme 2.2 this rule was part of Gendarme.Rules.Security and named TypeExposeFieldsRule.

DoNotExposeMethodsProtectedByLinkDemandRule

This rule checks for visible methods that are less protected (i.e. lower security requirements) than the method they call. If the called methods are protected by a LinkDemand then the caller can be used to bypass security checks.

Bad example:

public class BaseClass {
    [SecurityPermission (SecurityAction.LinkDemand, Unrestricted = true)]
    public virtual void VirtualMethod ()
    {
    }
}
 
public class Class : BaseClass  {
    // bad since a caller with only ControlAppDomain will be able to call the base method
    [SecurityPermission (SecurityAction.LinkDemand, ControlAppDomain = true)]
    public override void VirtualMethod ()
    {
        base.VirtualMethod ();
    }
}

Good example (InheritanceDemand):

public class BaseClass {
    [SecurityPermission (SecurityAction.LinkDemand, ControlAppDomain = true)]
    public virtual void VirtualMethod ()
    {
    }
}
 
public class Class : BaseClass  {
    // ok since this permission cover the base class permission
    [SecurityPermission (SecurityAction.LinkDemand, Unrestricted = true)]
    public override void VirtualMethod ()
    {
        base.VirtualMethod ();
    }
}

Notes

  • Before Gendarme 2.2 this rule was part of Gendarme.Rules.Security and named MethodCallWithSubsetLinkDemandRule.

DoNotReduceTypeSecurityOnMethodsRule

This rule checks for types that have declarative security permission which aren't a subset of the security permission of some of their methods.

Bad example:

[SecurityPermission (SecurityAction.Assert, ControlThread = true)]
public class NotSubset {
    [EnvironmentPermission (SecurityAction.Assert, Unrestricted = true)]
    public void Method ()
    {
    }
}

Good example:

[SecurityPermission (SecurityAction.Assert, ControlThread = true)]
public class Subset {
    [SecurityPermission (SecurityAction.Assert, Unrestricted = true)]
    public void Method ()
    {
    }
}

Notes

  • Before Gendarme 2.2 this rule was part of Gendarme.Rules.Security and named TypeIsNotSubsetOfMethodSecurityRule.

ReviewSealedTypeWithInheritanceDemandRule

This rule checks for sealed types that have InheritanceDemand declarative security applied to them. Since those types cannot be inherited from the InheritanceDemand will never be executed by the runtime. Check if the permission is required and, if so, change the SecurityAction to the correct one. Otherwise remove the permission.

Bad example:

[SecurityPermission (SecurityAction.InheritanceDemand, Unrestricted = true)]
public sealed class Bad {
}

Good example (non sealed):

[SecurityPermission (SecurityAction.InheritanceDemand, Unrestricted = true)]
public class Good {
}

Good example (LinkDemand):

[SecurityPermission (SecurityAction.LinkDemand, Unrestricted = true)]
public sealed class Good {
}

Notes

  • Before Gendarme 2.2 this rule was part of Gendarme.Rules.Security and named SealedTypeWithInheritanceDemandRule.

ReviewSuppressUnmanagedCodeSecurityUsageRule

This rule fires if a type or method is decorated with the [SuppressUnmanagedCodeSecurity]attribute. This attribute reduces the security checks done when executing unmanaged code and its usage should be reviewed to confirm that no exploitable security holes are present.

Example:

[SuppressUnmanagedCodeSecurity]
public class Safe {
    [DllImport ("User32.dll")]
    static extern Boolean MessageBeep (UInt32 beepType);
}

Notes

  • This is an Audit rule. As such it does not check for valid or invalid patterns but warns about a specific problem that needs to be reviewed by someone.

SecureGetObjectDataOverridesRule

This rule fires if a type implements System.Runtime.Serialization.ISerializablebut the GetObjectData method is not protected with a Demand or LinkDemand for SerializationFormatter.

Bad example:

public class Bad : ISerializable {
    public override void GetObjectData (SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context)
    {
    }
}

Good example:

public class Good : ISerializable {
    [SecurityPermission (SecurityAction.LinkDemand, SerializationFormatter = true)]
    public override void GetObjectData (SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context)
    {
    }
}

Notes

  • Before Gendarme 2.2 this rule was part of Gendarme.Rules.Security.

Feedback

Please report any documentation errors, typos or suggestions to the Gendarme Google Group. Thanks!